Would you like some antibiotics?

This is part two of my blog from Cambodia. The first part is here What can $6m buy you

I have spend some time at Angkor Hospital for Children and have been amazed. Amazed at the challenges faced and amazed at the quality of infection control given the limited resources. The IC program consists of continous prospective surveillance of all HAIs, hand hygiene, feedback of infection data, environmental cleaning (twice a day), cleaning audits, training, good governance and the list goes on.  Hand hygiene compliance is above 80%, but not all moments have been introduced yet (1000+ moments a month observed). IMG_2308

The fact that a hospital here can undertake continous surveillance of all HAIs is quite amazing. They asked if I could benchmark them against some Australian hospitals/what the rates are in Australia. And there we ended back to where this blog always seems to – a lack of co-ordinated, meaningful HAI surveillance at the national level in Australia.  But enought of that, see Phil’s blog for the pub test.

Not all is of course perfect, but given the resources, I think it is quite extrordinary. Another difficultly (apart from ovecrowding, lack of resources, limited clean water etc etc) is a some local work suggesting 60+% of patients coming into the hospital are colonised with a MRGN, mainly resistant in some form. That got us talking a lot about strategies and future work, but I also have myself an challenge….

This test invovled me trotting up to a local pharmacy. It went like this “My wife has a cut on her arm, it is inflammed/red”. That is pretty much it. The response:

  • Pharmacy 1 – topical cream that consistent of gentamicin, erythromycin and clotrimazole, all combined in one convenient tube. I asked about oral amoxicillin and was told “antibiotics you swallow are only for infections on the inside, the don’t work anywere else”.
  • Pharmacy 2 – Ciprofloxacin was handed to me.

Dishartened, I changed my tack. I went to another pharmacy and said “My wife has a cough and fever”. They asked if it was a dry cough. I said no, productive sputum. I was handed paracetamol. Yeah! There is hope.

This blog, I hope, illustrates the challenges  in infection control (&AMR) in a resource deprived country. We need to support our colleagues in our region, in any way we can. OneHealth is a global issue.

(By the way, I did not purchase any of the antibiotics, so as not to contribute to the issue).

 

 

 

 

 

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