National HAI PPS update – October 2018

The national healthcare associated infection point prevalence survey (CHAINS) is now in its third months of data collection, with 12 of the 19 participating hospitals having been visited by our Research Assistants, Sophie and Stephanie. Hospitals that have participated to date include:

  • University Hospital Geelong, Vic
  • Bendigo Health, Vic
  • Calvary Hospital, ACT
  • Launceston General Hospital, Tas
  • North West Regional Hospital, Tas
  • The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, SA
  • The Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA
  • The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Vic
  • The Tweed Hospital, Vic
  • Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, QLD
  • Frankston Hospital, Vic

From now until the end of data collection in the last week of November, data will be collected from:

  • Gold Coast University Hospital, QLD
  • Fiona Stanley Hospital, WA
  • Westmead Hospital, NSW
  • The Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW
  • Royal North Shore Hospital, NSW
  • Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital, NSW
  • Alfred Hospital, Vic

Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances regarding research activity in Western Australian hospitals, we have had to replace Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital with another site. At late notice, we are grateful to the team at Westmead Hospital NSW who have been able to process the required documentation at speed, and look forward to visiting them soon.

Once again, on behalf of the CHAINS team, sincere gratitude to all site investigators and infection prevention teams at the participating hospitals for their support and work on this exciting project. Some of you are pictured below!

 

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Deb and Stephanie, Redcliffe QLD

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Team Royal Brisbane and Womens, QLD

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Sophie, Marija, Angela and Stephanie, Royal Adelaide and Queen Elizabeth, SA

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Team Royal Melbourne, Vic

Best article for 2018 – #blogoff

Jon Otter and I have been having a ‘blog off’, with the aim of presenting the best infection control paper for 2018 (to date). Below, I put my case forward. You can read Jon’s post here. After you read both blogs and listen to points made via Twitter, we encourage you to vote (for the article I present!). Follow more on Twitter (@1healthau) and #mitchellvsotter via this link. Results will be presented during my social media talk on Monday 1st October (& via Twitter). You can vote using this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SL23H6K

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My (Brett Mitchell’s) choice of article

Choosing the best article is always fraught with danger. There are so many great infection control articles in 2018, but for this blog, I have chosen something that impacts everyone working in infection control – contact precautions (CP).  The article – Impact of Discontinuing Contact Precautions for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus: An Interrupted Time Series Analysis by Bearman et al.

There are three main reasons, why I believe this article is noteworthy:

  1. Advancement of knowledge in a difficult area
  2. Sets foundation for additional studies
  3. The implications for changing practice around contact precautions are profound

What is the article about?

In this single centre quasi experimental study, seven horizontal infection control interventions were evaluated. One of these, was the discontinuation of CP for patients with MRSA and VRE. During the study period, using interrupted time-series analysis, infection rates for MRSA and VRE decreased, in addition to device associated HAIs – following discontinuation of CP. Importantly, compliance with CP was monitored prior to cessation, 94% compliance with CPs hospital wide, from nearly 2700 observations. The authors conclude with the suggestions that the discontinuation of CP for patients infected or colonized with MRSA or VRE, when combined with horizontal infection prevention measures was not associated with an increased incidence of MRSA and VRE device-associated infections. MRSA HAI decreased by 1.3 per 100,000 bed days and VRE HAI decreased by 7.5/100,000 bed days. Not statistically significant, but clinically relevant in the context of no increase or difference.

Advancement of knowledge

Evidence supporting the use of CPs is largely based on observational studies, theory and expert opinion. Undertaking RCTs in infection control is challenging and not always possible, not the least on the topic of evaluating the impact of stopping CPs.  We have seen other work which has tested the value of universal glove and gown use, but limited work on ceasing CPs. This study takes a big step forward, using a robust design. It adds to a small but growing body of evidence investigating the universal application of CP for patients with any MRO.

Sets foundation

Another important aspect of this study, is that it sets the foundation for more work. It appears that no harm was caused as a result of ceasing CPs. This evidence is critical when attempting to seek funds for future studies, convincing a hospital to attempt something similar and obtaining ethical approvals. It was ‘gutsy’ to undertake a study that ceased CP, but the pragmatic and clever approach of bundling this with other horizontal infection control initiative made this palatable, as well as being able to unpick the relative effect of ceasing CP, using interrupted time series. In so doing, the authors have taken this controversial topic forward and established platform for multi-site sites (plus or minus randomisation).

For the record, I am not suggesting we should change practice around CPs yet, nor I am suggesting CP do not work in the prevention transmission of certain organisms. Rather, I am saying we should be open to the idea and support work that helps answer this question one way or another.

Implications

Imagine the implications if CPs were not required for patients with certain organisms. As quoted in a recent paper by Prof Nick GravesBecause you exist in a world of scarce resources, the choices you make have economic consequences”. The implications regarding CPs are significant and include the (reduction) in cost of personal protection equipment to the increased availability of single rooms as a starting point. In addition, think about the time invested in

identifying patients with MROs, placing them in CPs, monitoring compliance and the associated education with staff. The freeing up of resources, where there are finite resources, is critically important and present new opportunities.

The authors are to be congratulated for tackling a vexed issue and opening the door to the next stage. We need more research in infection prevention and control, that tackles the ‘known unknowns’, so we can advance the science of the profession, have practice underpinned by strong evidence and provide optimal patient care. Where else to start, than with evidence around CPs?  Regardless of whether you are clinician, an infection control professional, policy maker or researcher, this article should be of interest to you. Let’s hope more studies can build on this in the near future.

If you are in agreement, don’t forget to vote for this article here

 

The best IPC article of 2018: a blogoff with Brett Mitchell

You can see Jon Otter’s blog and case for the the best infection control article here

 

What product do you use prior to urinary catheter insertion?

There is conflicting evidence and hence variation in practice, on which solution you should use for meatal cleaning prior to urinary catheter insertion. A systematic review demonstrates the variation in evidence.

Which do you use in your hospital or clinical practice?

You can vote using the poll below. The results will form part of the discussion in a talk at the IPS conference and ACIPC conference.

So, which is correct?

Well, we will soon be able to tell you whether chlorhexidine or saline is better (or no difference) at reducing CAUTI and asymptomatic bacteriuria. We have undertaken a RCT in three hospitals, involving hundreds of patients and catheter insertions. The aim is to determine the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of chlorhexidine vs saline. The outcomes are asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI.

Data collection was completed earlier this year and analysis is also nearing completion.

Some preliminary results will be presented at the IPS conference in Glasgow in October and more detailed results at the ACIPC conference in Brisbane and HIS conference in Liverpool (England).

I would like to thank the participating hospitals – Canberra hospital, Sydney Adventist Hospital and Lismore hospital.

More to come on this, so stay tuned. The results, regardless of what they are, will help shape guidelines and clinical practice internationally.

Brett

Researcher team: Prof Brett Mitchell, Dr Oyebola Fasugba, Dr Anne Gardner, Dr Jane Koerner, Prof Peter Collignon, Prof Allen Cheng, Prof Nick Graves, Mrs Vicky Gregory (Project Manager)

Funding: This project is supported a grant from the HCF Foundation, a nationally competitive grant.

References

Fasugba, O., Koerner, J., Mitchell, B. G., & Gardner, A. (2017). Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of antiseptic agents for meatal cleaning in the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Journal of Hospital Infection, 95(3), 233-242.

Mitchell, B. G., Fasugba, O., Gardner, A., Koerner, J., Collignon, P., Cheng, A. C., … & Gregory, V. (2017). Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitals: study protocol for a multi-site randomised controlled study. BMJ open, 7(11), e018871.
Chicago.

 

National HAI PPS update – August 2018 (2). Data collection has commenced

It is exciting to see data collection for the CHAINS project has commenced. This week marks the third week of data collection. So far Sophie and Stephanie have visited University Hospital Geelong and Bendigo Health, busy collecting data via the electronic survey tool on their mobile devices. The survey tool allows for direct entry into the database to ensure no data loss on devices.

Thank you to the Site Investigators and Clinicians at both sites for their work and warm hospitality. It is greatly appreciated.

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The CHAINS team Stephanie (L) and Sophie (R) with Alison from University Hospital Geelong

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CHAINS team with Mandy and Jane from Bendigo Health

 

Reducing urinary catheter use

One of the ways  to reduce the risk of catheter associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is to reduce catheter duration. Evidence has shown the value of stop orders and reminders (to remove the catheter ASAP) at reducing the incidence of CAUTI.

We have finished a RCT  in an Australian hospital, exploring the effect of an electronic reminder, attached to a catheter bag, on reducing catheter duration. We also surveyed nurses and undertook a focus group.

I’m looking forward to presenting results at the IPS conference in Glasgow and ACIPC later in the year in Australia. 

 

Researchers: Mitchell, BG., Fasugba, O., Russo, P., Cheng, A., Northcote, M. (Hannah Rosebrock, Research Officer).

Funding: This study was supported by an Commonwealth government commercialisation grant.

References

Meddings, J., Rogers, M. A., Krein, S. L., Fakih, M. G., Olmsted, R. N., & Saint, S. (2014). Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review. BMJ Qual saf, 23(4), 277-289.

National HAI Point Prevalence Survey – August 2018 update

Data collection commencing!!

It has been an exciting month for the National Healthcare Associated Infection Point Prevalence Survey team. Our two Research Assistants, Sophia Robinson and Stephanie Curtis, have commenced their appointments and spent the past month undergoing surveillance training. After rigorously testing the data collection tool, they are now experts in utilising the tool to investigate HAIs and are excited to commence the data collection at our sites.

Site visits for data collection across Australia will commence next week, August 8th and continue until November 30th. We have locked in several dates with sites, starting with Geelong, Bendigo, Launceston, Burnie and Adelaide.

As previously announced, 19 hospitals will be participating in the study, these hospitals are listed below. We sincerely thank all the hospitals for their involvement, particularly the site Principal Investigators who have worked hard to progress ethics approvals and organise the logistics of our visits. We look forward to visiting you all soon!

  • Alfred Hospital, Vic
  • Bendigo Health, Vic
  • Calvary Hospital, ACT
  • Fiona Stanley Hospital, WA
  • Frankston Hospital, Vic
  • Gold Coast University Hospital, QLD
  • Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital, NSW
  • Launceston General Hospital, Tas
  • North West Regional Hospital, Tas
  • Redcliffe Hospital, QLD
  • Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, QLD
  • Royal North Shore Hospital, NSW
  • Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, WA
  • The Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW
  • The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, SA
  • The Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA
  • The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Vic
  • The Tweed Hospital, Vic
  • University Hospital Geelong, Vic

 

​We will continue to provide updates on the project through this blog and Twitter via @PLR_aus and @1healthau , or for further information please contact either Dr Philip Russo or Professor Brett Mitchell 

 


Stephanie Curtis, Research Assistant, Australian National Healthcare Associated Infection Point Prevalence Survey