Nurse and Midwife Cleaning Study

Background

A study is being planned to evaluate Australian Nurses and Midwives knowledge and practice around the role of the environment and infection prevention and control. The first step of this study is an online survey, and interviews. This will then inform the next steps of the project. If you are registered Nurse, Midwife or enrolled nurse working in Australia, we are seeking your input by completing a short survey, which will take less than 10 minutes to complete.

One in ten patients in Australian hospitals today have a healthcare associated infection [1]. Cleaning plays an important role in preventing infections and is cost-effective [2-3]. The ultimate goal of this project, is to find solutions to improving cleaning shared by patients.

Information

Participant information Information Statement -Survey

Participation

When the study opens, a link to the survey will be here.

Results

Findings from the study will published here, when available.

Researchers

The research team for this project are Professor Brett Mitchell, A/Professor Phil Russo and Martin Kiernan.

 

References

1. Russo, P. L., Stewardson, A. J., Cheng, A. C., Bucknall, T., & Mitchell, B. G. (2019). The prevalence of healthcare associated infections among adult inpatients at nineteen large Australian acute-care public hospitals: a point prevalence survey. Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control, 8(1), 114. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13756-019-0570-y

2. Mitchell, B. G., Hall, L., White, N., Barnett, A. G., Halton, K., Paterson, D. L., … & Gericke, C. A. (2019). An environmental cleaning bundle and health-care-associated infections in hospitals (REACH): a multicentre, randomised trial. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 19(4), 410-418. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30714-X

3. White, N. M., Barnett, A. G., Hall, L., Mitchell, B. G., Farrington, A., Halton, K., … & Gericke, C. A. (2019). Cost-effectiveness of an environmental cleaning bundle for reducing healthcare associated infections. Clinical Infectious Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz717