Tag Archives: conference

#A Trawl for Trends

In the lead up to the ACIPC conference in Canberra next week, I thought it might be timely to write something about the use of Twitter at infection control conferences. Thanks to Gabby Milgate for assisting with this blog.

Some of you might know that last year, a group of us reviewed tweets from four infection control/ID conferences – UK Infection Prevention Society, ID Week2016, The Federation of Infectious Society/Hospital Infection Society and the Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control. Read the article here . 

Twitter as a medium for infection control content has grown from 181 Tweets at IPS2011 to 11,457 tweets at IPS2016. This rapid growth seems to suggest the twitter epidemic is contagious! The analysis of tweets from these four conferences identified trends in conference-related twitter activity.

Here are some evidence-based trends to help your infection prevention tweeimagests fly!

  1. Tweets with web-links are more likely to be retweeted, all things considered
  2. Picture are out – these are less likely to be re-tweeted, all things considered
  3. Tweeting on topics such as ‘Cleaning’, “Media@, ‘Clostridium Difficile’, ‘Antiseptic’, ‘Infection prevention and control’ and ‘Hand hygiene’ are more often retweeted.

I’ll be talking more about this at the ACIPC conference next week – the abstract is here

Not only has Twitter been used to broaden conference exposure and encourage attendees to further engage with content but the Royal Society of Chemistry hosted an entire conference on Twitter. The conference had an audience of 380,000 online users, without a ‘face-to-face’ component.  The conference was both cost-effective and far-reaching.  Additionally, its virtual delivery eliminated risks of airborne or droplet transmission of infections!

Twitter may serve as a useful tool for infection control professionals and enthusiasts to broaden their networks, providing a platform for infection related discourse and a mode of communication for health promotion and education to the general public of social media users.

Perhaps a future trending topic: ‘Twitterer’s twiddling their thumbs on their devices practice excellent hand hygiene’.

TwitterFor those attending the Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control or want to follow what is happening from a distance, follow #ACIPC17 – and of course the authors of this blog!

 

Network Analysis: A line (edge) between usernames, indicates a relationship – a tweet sent by one person that included the username the other.  (IPS = Infection Prevention Society)

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step – Laozi

(This blog was inspired by the session at ECCMID 2016 also mentioned by Brett)

There are some things we Antipodeans are good at and are arguably international leaders, and some things we’re not (sporting references will be overlooked for now).

Take for example Australia’s innovative and novel National Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI). Obviously declaring conflict here, but a national program rolled out across Australia that recently had over 900 healthcare facilities submit compliance data is an example of what enthusiasm, strong leadership, central coordination and jurisdictional cooperation combined with adequate resources can achieve.

Clearly the start up of the NHHI was resource intensive, and this has been well documented,  and it is difficult to measure the precise effect the NHHI has had on HAIs, particularly when HAI surveillance in Australia is so disparate. Undeniably it has bought the importance of hand hygiene to the forefront of clinicians, executive and politicians. And when these groups listen to infection prevention, it’s a good thing.

Australia also leads the way in antimicrobial stewardship. At the recent ECCMID conference in Amsterdam, AMS was a common theme in many sessions, and several Australians presented new knowledge identified through novel audit tools. Feedback from across the globe has reflected much interest at the appropriateness data being generated.

And then there are things that make us watch in awe, like surveillance. My poster on national surveillance in Australia at ECCMID received a moderate amount of visitors (and not one mistook me for being Austrian). The top two comments were “Nice layout, good colors” and “Really, you don’t have a national surveillance program?”

As Brett has mentioned in his post, the final session at ECCMID was about surveillance and public reporting, and we had Eli Perencevich present perspectives from the US and Europe. England now has a public reporting tool where consumers can drill down to Trust by infection and time period for an assortment of HAIs, presumably this will expand to all mandatory surveillance activities in the future. A presentation by Maaike van Mourik from the Netherlands about semi and fully automated surveillance systems and their utility for the numerous stakeholders was inspiring. Maaike demonstrated how a semi automated surveillance system resulted in an impressive surveillance workload reduction for ICPs and 100% case sensitivity

Will we live to see the day in Australia where electronically sourced, risk adjusted HAI data is collected by an automated surveillance program which is then analysed and interpreted by infection prevention experts, and then submitted to a central agency where data is collated, benchmarks established, and published on an interactive webpage providing complete transparency for consumers?

Unfortunately many other countries are closer to that day than Australia, but we must move in this direction… A journey of a thousand miles…

Why have a national HAI surveillance program, (I hear you ask), when the surveillance you do is perfectly adequate for your needs? Answers to that question will be provided in later blogs!

PLR

ECCMID: surveillance my favourite

Welcome to Infectiondigest. On this blog you will hear thoughts, reflections and maybe the occasional rambling on issues that relate to infection prevention and control.We hope to stimulate some debate and discussion on a range of topics, in the backdrop of our geographical region.

I recently went to ECCMID in Amsterdam. With over 11,000 attendees it is certainly a conference that attracts delegates. There were a few reasons why I wanted to go: to catch up with colleagues, build networks and update knowledge both in certain areas of ID and also infection prevention and control. It ticked the box on all counts, but the IP&C content was the most disappointing. There was not much content on this topic, relative to others in my view. It is very interesting hearing about latest treatments and drugs but in the end, we are and will continue to be become more reliant on ‘basic’ infection control practices. What we really need is investment in high quality infection control studies.

For me, on IP&C, one of the highlights was a talk on the last day, before I had to quickly leave to catch my plane. Automated monitoring of nosocomial infections . This talk made me think about how far behind we are in Australia when it comes to surveillance. There we were in Amsterdam, contemplating the pros and cons of automated vs semi automated surveillance, whereas in Australia, we barely have a national HAI surveillance program.  Perhaps we will leapfrog everyone else in this space, but I doubt it.

 

Brett Mitchell @infectiondigest